Locus Review of One for Sorrow

Gary Wolfe reviewed One for Sorrow in Locus this month.  It was a feature review, and I loved reading what he made of the book.  Okay, so I love reading and hearing what anyone thinks about the book, but this was yet another one of those detailed, thoughtful reviews that I enjoy so much, that offer me insights into my own writing, which is one of the things I think a good review can do for writers.

What finally holds the novel together isn’t the wealth of its supernatural invention, but its sharp, unsentimental characterization, its stark immediacy of setting, and — perhaps most of all — Barzak’s spare, lyrical prose which, as in his earlier short stories (including “Dead Boy Found”, which appeared in Kelly Link’s 1993 Trampoline and provided the germ of One for Sorrow) is compelling enough to convince you that Barzak is an auspicious new voice, deeply humane, deeply intelligent, and deeply observant. It’s one of the strongest first novels I’ve seen this year.

Read the rest here.

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Just a little change

Since I’m rearranging stuff in my house, making it how I want to live in it for a while, I thought I’d make some changes on this website too.  I think I like the look of this one for now, but leave the option open to change however many times I like in the future.  I wish I knew how to build websites.  But if I could, I would probably stop writing and just start designing websites, because it seems like an awfully fun thing to do too.

I ate far too much for Thanksgiving, but it was so, so, so good.  Now I have to figure out how to get my self-discipline back.  Did anyone see where I left it?

Not an invitation for smart-ass comments (that includes you, too, Bowes.) 😉

Way Cool Moments

The San Francisco Chronicle recently published their holiday gift-book recommendations, and on the sf list you will find Bad Monkeys by Matt Ruff, along with Kage Baker’s The Sons of Heaven, Emma Bull’s Territory, Joe Hill’s 20th Century Ghosts, China Mieville’s Un Lun Dun, Naomi Novik’s Empire of Ivory, Patrick Rothfuss’ The Name of the Wind, Dan Simmons’ The Terror, Charlie Stross’ Halting State and my own One For Sorrow.

Another way cool moment. I’m having a lot of those lately. It feels weird.

SF Site Review

Paul Kincaid on One for Sorrow:

Whether you read the ghost story as a metaphor for Adam’s psychological travails, or the upheavals in Adam’s family as a grim mirror for the haunting, this is a superbly structured, beautifully written coming of age story. It is, in its way, as powerful and affecting a debut as The Catcher in the Rye was half a century before.

That’s the end of the review (the part where I thought, awesome!!) but there’s a really amazingly detailed summary and explication of the book’s plot that precedes this.

The Literary Detective

flags.jpgViriginie over at The Literary Detective wrote about One for Sorrow on her French blog last month, and in between then and now she interviewed me for a new series of author interviews that she would like to start. Here are the results of our interview across the ocean. She asked really great questions, and having done a number of interviews about One for Sorrow in the past few months, I can say assuredly that they were great. You can read our interview en francais too.

Winter Blog Blast

Today Ms. Bond over at Shaken and Stirred posted an interview with me for the Winter Blog Blast, and tomorrow Colleen Mondor will be doing the same at her blog Chasing Ray.

I’ve been doing so many interviews lately, I’m not sure if I’m repeating myself or dreaming of answering questions, or what.  Today I wrote responses to an interview for a website in France, and then, in a moment of confusion, deleted the answers, somehow thinking that I had emailed them to my interviewer.  When I realized what I’d done (six hours later) I ran up to my office at the university and turned on the computer, hoping to find the deleted file in the computer’s recycle bin.  It was empty.  Apparently the university computers are set to empty contents daily.  Now when I rewrite those answers tomorrow my sense of deja vu will be even more pronounced.

Sweet dreams.  And see you at Chasing Ray tomorrow.